This blog offers SHRA associates a less formal place to write about the intersection of current events, academia and history. We will also share "finds" from the various primary sources we examine. We post both Features, our long form pieces, and Vignettes, fun, interesting and notable shorts that we think would be of interest to our readers but that don’t warrant a longer analysis. To see some of our longer analytical pieces, click on Features. For shorter reads, click on Vignettes.

4/5/17 – Sacramento Dreaming

A recent research trip took the SHRA team to Sacramento, California. The project we were working on had us examining events during the very early days of California statehood, when San Francisco was by far the biggest and most influential city in the new state. As we sat at the State Library, looking out at… read more

3/29/17 – The History of the Olympics…or the Olympics as History, Part III

The memories of last summer’s Rio Olympic Games are still fresh in the minds of sports aficionados, however, much of the fanfare and excitement that existed leading up to and during the event have faded from the public arena. As time progresses, the victories, defeats, and organizational challenges and successes of the Rio Games will… read more

2/22/17 – “Let’s Go for a Drive”

During recent public history project research, I stumbled across an article and photographs by Otto M. Jones published in the Idaho Daily Statesman in 1919. The article described the “arduous task” of travelling “steep winding grades that are not inducive [sic] of much speed or tempered with any degree of safety or security.”[1] The accompanying… read more

2/8/17 – National Parks, History, and Amalia Baldwin

This past August 2016, the National Park Service celebrated its 100th birthday. The speeches, parties, news stories, and commemorations across the country were a way for Americans to reflect on one of the most incredible ideas this country has had. Despite the challenges the national parks face now and will continue to face in the… read more

2/1/17 – History Of…and At The Huntington

As a research historian with SHRA, I have been fortunate to travel to some fascinating places for work. A recent research trip took me to The Huntington Library in San Marino, California. Unlike other repositories that I have visited, The Huntington Library is a privately held, non-profit institution that boasts not only myriad collections and… read more

1/4/17 -The Legacy of Minidoka and the Work of Dr. Robert Sims

Editor’s Note:  Today’s post is courtesy of guest blogger Dr. Cheryl Oestreicher, Head, Special Collections, Boise State University.  You can read Dr. Oestreicher’s previous guest blog for SHRA here.  You can read more about the exhibit in this Idaho Statesman article, published February 7, 2017. As an archivist, I have a social responsibility to collect records… read more

12/14/16 – Fall 2016 Newsletter

Recently, we mailed our Fall 2016 newsletter.  In this edition, we’re looking at Minneapolis-St Paul’s urban waterfront, and introduce our latest hire, Amalia Baldwin.  Click on the the link below to catch up on all of SHRA’s latest news… SHRA Fall 2016 Newsletter  

11/9/16 -The History of the Olympics…or the Olympics as History, Part II

Fanfare, Glory, Spectacle: The opening ceremonies of the Olympic Games invite spectators to lose themselves in a state of suspended disbelief, even if for the briefest of moments. The combination of music, lights, and the palpable excitement at the most recent Rio Olympics filled the arena as the event commenced. This opening event and the… read more

9/28/16 – The History of the Olympics…or the Olympics as History, Part I

With the impressive, theatrical, and culturally provocative closing ceremony of 2016 Rio Summer Olympics behind us, I thought it fitting to compose my thoughts on the history of this global event that brings the world a bit closer together for a few weeks every four years. Undoubtedly, the Olympics inspire feelings of patriotism for one’s… read more

9/7/16 – Historic Cookbooks

As a historian, I read a lot of books. And as a foodie, I read a lot of cookbooks. While many of the history books I read are newly published within the last few years, others date back decades. Typically, these books fall into the category of a secondary source, meaning that they reveal what… read more

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