Amalia Baldwin, M.S.

baldwinheadshotAmalia Baldwin comes to us from Madison, Wisconsin where she earned her Master of Science degree in Environmental Studies from the University of Wisconsin’s Nelson Institute in 2008. At the University of Wisconsin Amalia was advised by Dr. Nancy Langston, a well-published environmental historian, former Editor of Environmental History and past President of the American Society for Environmental History. Amalia’s Master’s thesis, Becoming Wilderness: Nature, History and the Making of Isle Royale National Park, was published as a book in 2011. Following graduate school, Amalia worked for the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources for eight years in a variety of roles before moving to Boise.

Amalia has always been fascinated by the relationship between people and place, especially in protected places. She explored this interest during her undergraduate years at Yale University where she majored in Anthropology. Under the tutelage of Dr. Andrew Hill and Dr. Rebecca Hardin, Amalia wrote a Senior Thesis, Busy Rock/Empty Center: Uluru and Kakadu National Parks and the World Heritage Designation, which was a finalist for best senior thesis in the major. Amalia graduated Magna Cum Laude with distinction in the major in 2001.

Between undergraduate and graduate work Amalia worked for the National Park Service as an interpretive ranger in several different parks around the country. This work afforded her the opportunity to interact with people from around the United States and the world and hear about their experiences in wild places. She also gave many public programs about the history of particular parks, the park service and the human desire to protect wild spaces. She also enjoyed living in some of the most spectacular landscapes in the United States and taking weekend backpacking adventures.

Amalia loves to read about, write about and travel to wild places around the globe, but is just as excited to be living in Boise where trail running, bicycle commuting and historical research are all just a part of a day’s work.