Features

12/16/15 – The Transformation of American Christmas

If I were to hand you a calendar and ask you to point out the most American of our national holidays, which one would you choose?  The Fourth of July and Thanksgiving would be clear frontrunners, but would you choose Christmas?  There is an argument to be made that you should. In our country’s pre-history,… Read the Rest »

12/9/15 – The History of the War Assets Administration

On December 7, 1941, the Empire of Japan’s naval and air forces of attacked the United States at Pearl Harbor, a date that President Franklin Delano Roosevelt exclaimed “would live in infamy.”[1] He quite accurately anticipated that this event would mark a pivotal moment in American history. In commemoration of that date, this week’s blog… Read the Rest »

11/25/15 – Meatless Monday

“Meatless, Wheatless, and Sweetless!” It sounds more like a modern fad diet than something you would see in the archives. But alas, that is precisely where SHRA stumbled upon this intriguing statement. We found the phrase so compelling we had to dig deeper. As history would have it, the origins of the phrase can be… Read the Rest »

11/4/15 – Teaching Business with History: A Case Study on Garrett Freightlines

Idaho’s history is rich in many ways, but one facet of the state’s history that seems to strike a particular chord with me is the history of its abundant legacy family businesses. I first came across this history as a graduate student at Boise State where I focused my thesis research on the history of… Read the Rest »

10/21/15 – The Legacy of Public Libraries – Then and Now, Part II

Today’s blog is the second installment in SHRA’s series on libraries. The first installment discussed the role that libraries played in historic mining towns. Today’s installment looks at the more contemporary issues that mining communities face. When people think of U.S. mining industry history, many people immediately think of the 1850s California Gold Rush. But… Read the Rest »

10/14/15 – Starvation Heights

I’ve never been a fan of Halloween. As a child I didn’t enjoy dressing up, so I gladly took my parents’ offer to buy one candy bar of my choosing to enjoy every October 31st instead of going trick-or-treating in Washington’s infamous drizzle. Growing up in the small, idyllic town of Port Orchard, Washington, the… Read the Rest »

10/7/15 – Book Review – The Oregon Trail: A New American Journey by Rinker Buck

During the 15 years prior to the Civil War, historians estimate that more than 400,000 pioneers headed west via covered wagon. In the summer of 2007, I found myself driving from Western Washington to Rhode Island, a true “coast-to-coast” crossing, using a modern vehicle. My dog Griffin kept me company and from Utah to Iowa,… Read the Rest »

9/23/15 -The Legacy of Public Libraries – Then and Now, Part I

In the course of doing research for our active projects, SHRA researchers often come across articles from historic publications or find fascinating archival material that triggers a memory or provokes a question that compels us to further explore. I recently had such an experience when researching in a historic issue of the Engineering and Mining… Read the Rest »

9/9/15 – The National Archives: Making and Keeping History, Part Two

Editor’s note:  This is the second installment in the blog series on history of the National Archives. Read the first installment here. Fire drills used to always reminded me of middle school, where students filed out of the classroom in single-file lines to congregate at the designated meeting place. Excitement was usually the emotion that… Read the Rest »

9/2/15 – A Study of Traditions and Superstitions at Two Universities

Editor’s Note:  Today’s blog installment comes from Molly Myers, SHRA’s college intern in summer 2015. We are sorry to see her go, and we wish her all the best during what will be her last year of college at St. Andrews. The University of St. Andrews and College of William and Mary Joint Degree Program,… Read the Rest »

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