General Public History

6/8/16 – Spring 2016 Newsletter

Last week, we mailed our Spring 2016 newsletter.  In this edition, we’re looking at new frontiers in history and the digital humanities, and include updates on our staff historians.  Click on the the link below to catch up on all of SHRA’s latest news… Spring 2016 Newsletter

5/25/16 – The Thompson Writing Awards

The Center of the American West held its 17th Annual Thompson Writing Awards last month in Boulder, Colorado. Having been involved with the organization since enrolling in the Center’s certificate program in 2008, I was thrilled to be asked to judge in the poetry category of this year’s contest and then attend the awards ceremony…. Read the Rest »

5/18/16 -Traveling Through the Mountains…on Camel Back?

I have always found the history of transportation in the West exciting, but as a historian, I find this subject increasingly relevant not only because it tells a story about changing technology and regional development, but because it also speaks to the power of individual ingenuity and innovation. While I was conducting research for an… Read the Rest »

5/4/16 – History PhD Alum Invites Students to Consider “What’s Next?”

On April 22, 2016, Jennifer Stevens was invited to speak to a group of graduate students at the UC Davis Humanities Institute on professions outside of academia.  The event was co-sponsored by the History Department.  Dr. Stevens received her PhD in History from UC Davis in 2008. Dr. Stevens discussed her path to focusing on public… Read the Rest »

4/6/16 – Santa Anita in the 1940s

Recently, the SHRA research team had the opportunity to visit Santa Anita Park, a horse racing venue in Arcadia, CA.  They saw a statue of Seabiscuit, an unlikely champion thoroughbred whose last triumphant race was run there on March 2, 1940.  The race, the Santa Anita Handicap, had a purse of $125,000 and Seabiscuit had… Read the Rest »

3/30/16 – Jennifer Stevens answers “Ask a Consulting Historian”

This week on History@Work, the National Council on Public History’s blog, SHRA’s own Jennifer Stevens is profiled in their “Ask a Consulting Historian” series.  If you’ve ever wondered what a career in entrepreneurial history looks like, thought about pursuing history as a career, or just wanted to know more about SHRA, you can do so… Read the Rest »

3/7/16 – The History of the U.S. Botanic Garden

It’s been mighty cold here in Boise and in an attempt to warm up I swiped through cell phone pictures from spring and summer. While doing so, I stumbled upon photographs I’d taken while at the U.S. Botanic Garden in Washington D.C. My sister, mother, and I vacationed in our nation’s capital over Memorial Day… Read the Rest »

2/17/16 – Comets

For thousands of years the night sky has elicited awe and inspiration. Cultures from around the world have drawn spiritual connections to the twinkling stars and the various shapes of the moon, but perhaps nothing has captivated the human population as much as comets. Last month I came across 19th-century sketches of comets while conducting… Read the Rest »

2/10/16 – A History of Valentine’s Day

My husband refuses to celebrate Valentine’s Day. He spits proclamations of it being a manufactured holiday and for years has eschewed the red roses, sparkling jewelry, and rich chocolate. While Valentine’s Day certainly isn’t my favorite holiday, February 14th falls into this lull where the end-of-the-year holidays are over and spring hasn’t quite sprung. So… Read the Rest »

2/3/16 – The Legacy of Public Libraries – Then and Now, Part III

The American metal industry and public libraries have a fascinating and intertwined history. Glimpses into this rather unexpected historical narrative can be explored in the two previous installments of this blog series, available here and here. But nowhere is the connection between these two entities more pronounced than in the philanthropic work of Andrew Carnegie. Andrew… Read the Rest »

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