Hannalore Hein

11/14/18 – Fall 2018 Newsletter

SHRA recently sent out our Fall 2018 Newsletter.  Topics for this edition include Architectural History and a milestone anniversary for one of our employees.  You can sign-up to join our electronic mailing list at the bottom of our homepage.

12/27/17 – Modern Day Research Trips and the Famed Golden Age of Travel, Part 2

The hustle and bustle of holiday travel is upon us. The surge of families with small children and less-experienced travelers at airports across the country means busier terminals, shorter tempers, and heightened levels of excitement…for some. As a result, the holiday-induced shift in travel patterns has me once again thinking about aviation, so get ready…Read the Rest »

7/26/17 – Modern Day Research Trips and The Famed Golden Age of Travel

My job description at SHRA clearly outlines that travel is required. In fact, all historians with SHRA can expect to travel and work away from the office roughly 25% of the time. This is to be expected of a job where we are in search of rare documents that likely exist in only one repository…Read the Rest »

3/29/17 – The History of the Olympics…or the Olympics as History, Part III

The memories of last summer’s Rio Olympic Games are still fresh in the minds of sports aficionados, however, much of the fanfare and excitement that existed leading up to and during the event have faded from the public arena. As time progresses, the victories, defeats, and organizational challenges and successes of the Rio Games will…Read the Rest »

2/1/17 – History Of…and At The Huntington

As a research historian with SHRA, I have been fortunate to travel to some fascinating places for work. A recent research trip took me to The Huntington Library in San Marino, California. Unlike other repositories that I have visited, The Huntington Library is a privately held, non-profit institution that boasts not only myriad collections and…Read the Rest »

11/9/16 -The History of the Olympics…or the Olympics as History, Part II

Fanfare, Glory, Spectacle: The opening ceremonies of the Olympic Games invite spectators to lose themselves in a state of suspended disbelief, even if for the briefest of moments. The combination of music, lights, and the palpable excitement at the most recent Rio Olympics filled the arena as the event commenced. This opening event and the…Read the Rest »

9/28/16 – The History of the Olympics…or the Olympics as History, Part I

With the impressive, theatrical, and culturally provocative closing ceremony of 2016 Rio Summer Olympics behind us, I thought it fitting to compose my thoughts on the history of this global event that brings the world a bit closer together for a few weeks every four years. Undoubtedly, the Olympics inspire feelings of patriotism for one’s…Read the Rest »

9/7/16 – Historic Cookbooks

As a historian, I read a lot of books. And as a foodie, I read a lot of cookbooks. While many of the history books I read are newly published within the last few years, others date back decades. Typically, these books fall into the category of a secondary source, meaning that they reveal what…Read the Rest »

5/25/16 – The Thompson Writing Awards

The Center of the American West held its 17th Annual Thompson Writing Awards last month in Boulder, Colorado. Having been involved with the organization since enrolling in the Center’s certificate program in 2008, I was thrilled to be asked to judge in the poetry category of this year’s contest and then attend the awards ceremony….Read the Rest »

5/18/16 -Traveling Through the Mountains…on Camel Back?

I have always found the history of transportation in the West exciting, but as a historian, I find this subject increasingly relevant not only because it tells a story about changing technology and regional development, but because it also speaks to the power of individual ingenuity and innovation. While I was conducting research for an…Read the Rest »

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