Urban History

1/24/18 – SHRA Newsletters for 2017

Twice a year, SHRA sends out newsletters covering research, staff and business updates.  In Spring 2017, we looked at planned development on an old industrial site in Boise, and in Fall 2017, we discussed Jennifer Stevens new role as a Professor of the Practice at Boise State University. Click the links below to read more…Read the Rest »

1/10/18 – Boise’s “Geothermal Gem”

Since the late 19th century, Boise’s geothermal energy has been an economic and cultural driver of the city’s development. A variety of entrepreneurs capitalized on the region’s active geologic inheritance to provide Boiseans with cheap and sustainable energy and, in doing so, pioneered the first geothermal heating district in the United States. Forty years later,…Read the Rest »

1/3/18 – Bringing Boise’s Geothermal Past, Forward: “The Heat Beneath Your Feet”

Idaho’s extreme landscapes allude to the state’s violent geologic past, from the towering 12,000-foot peaks of the Lost River Range to Craters of the Moon National Monument. Periodic episodes of volcanic activity shaped Idaho’s sceneries and, in many ways, continue to define the state today. The cinder cones and lava plumes endowed Idaho with rare-earth…Read the Rest »

7/19/17 – Teddy Roosevelt in a Forrest Gump Land

It is, perhaps, old hat to remark on the loss of a broader human story when we choose to memorialize a landscape in a particular way, but I was recently reminded of how prevalent this occurrence is in a place I least expected: downtown Washington D.C. As someone who studied environmental history, and especially wilderness…Read the Rest »

3/29/17 – The History of the Olympics…or the Olympics as History, Part III

The memories of last summer’s Rio Olympic Games are still fresh in the minds of sports aficionados, however, much of the fanfare and excitement that existed leading up to and during the event have faded from the public arena. As time progresses, the victories, defeats, and organizational challenges and successes of the Rio Games will…Read the Rest »

12/14/16 – Fall 2016 Newsletter

Recently, we mailed our Fall 2016 newsletter.  In this edition, we’re looking at Minneapolis-St Paul’s urban waterfront, and introduce our latest hire, Amalia Baldwin.  Click on the the link below to catch up on all of SHRA’s latest news… SHRA Fall 2016 Newsletter  

4/6/16 – Santa Anita in the 1940s

Recently, the SHRA research team had the opportunity to visit Santa Anita Park, a horse racing venue in Arcadia, CA.  They saw a statue of Seabiscuit, an unlikely champion thoroughbred whose last triumphant race was run there on March 2, 1940.  The race, the Santa Anita Handicap, had a purse of $125,000 and Seabiscuit had…Read the Rest »

2/3/16 – The Legacy of Public Libraries – Then and Now, Part III

The American metal industry and public libraries have a fascinating and intertwined history. Glimpses into this rather unexpected historical narrative can be explored in the two previous installments of this blog series, available here and here. But nowhere is the connection between these two entities more pronounced than in the philanthropic work of Andrew Carnegie. Andrew…Read the Rest »

1/27/16 – Up in Smoke

We conduct a lot of research in historic trade journals here at SHRA. While some might find the task of going through a 400-page bound volume rather tedious, as historians, we have great fun from the moment the weary spine of a volume squeaks back to life until we close the massive book and plumes…Read the Rest »

10/21/15 – The Legacy of Public Libraries – Then and Now, Part II

Today’s blog is the second installment in SHRA’s series on libraries. The first installment discussed the role that libraries played in historic mining towns. Today’s installment looks at the more contemporary issues that mining communities face. When people think of U.S. mining industry history, many people immediately think of the 1850s California Gold Rush. But…Read the Rest »

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