Where We Work

2/22/17 – “Let’s Go for a Drive”

During recent public history project research, I stumbled across an article and photographs by Otto M. Jones published in the Idaho Daily Statesman in 1919. The article described the “arduous task” of travelling “steep winding grades that are not inducive [sic] of much speed or tempered with any degree of safety or security.”[1] The accompanying… Read the Rest »

2/1/17 – History Of…and At The Huntington

As a research historian with SHRA, I have been fortunate to travel to some fascinating places for work. A recent research trip took me to The Huntington Library in San Marino, California. Unlike other repositories that I have visited, The Huntington Library is a privately held, non-profit institution that boasts not only myriad collections and… Read the Rest »

1/4/17 -The Legacy of Minidoka and the Work of Dr. Robert Sims

Editor’s Note:  Today’s post is courtesy of guest blogger Dr. Cheryl Oestreicher, Head, Special Collections, Boise State University.  You can read Dr. Oestreicher’s previous guest blog for SHRA here.   As an archivist, I have a social responsibility to collect records that document all aspects of history, particularly underrepresented people, events, and organizations. Archival records serve to… Read the Rest »

7/6/16 – Chronicling the Sinking of the Titanic

You’ve heard it screeched on playgrounds, bellowed at parties, and parodied all over the internet. “I’ll never let go, Jack!” It’s the iconic line Rose (played by Kate Winslet) calls out to her beloved Jack (played by Leonardo DiCaprio) in James Cameron’s 1997 movie Titanic. Almost 20 years on, the line — and the movie… Read the Rest »

6/8/16 – Spring 2016 Newsletter

Last week, we mailed our Spring 2016 newsletter.  In this edition, we’re looking at new frontiers in history and the digital humanities, and include updates on our staff historians.  Click on the the link below to catch up on all of SHRA’s latest news… Spring 2016 Newsletter

5/11/16 – The Continuing Business of History

Long-time followers of this blog will recognize several recurring themes. In addition to a passion for history, our historians have a passion for the business of history.   Many people outside the profession don’t know the full gamut of career opportunities outside of academia that are available to students of history – or the humanities in… Read the Rest »

5/4/16 – History PhD Alum Invites Students to Consider “What’s Next?”

On April 22, 2016, Jennifer Stevens was invited to speak to a group of graduate students at the UC Davis Humanities Institute on professions outside of academia.  The event was co-sponsored by the History Department.  Dr. Stevens received her PhD in History from UC Davis in 2008. Dr. Stevens discussed her path to focusing on public… Read the Rest »

4/6/16 – Santa Anita in the 1940s

Recently, the SHRA research team had the opportunity to visit Santa Anita Park, a horse racing venue in Arcadia, CA.  They saw a statue of Seabiscuit, an unlikely champion thoroughbred whose last triumphant race was run there on March 2, 1940.  The race, the Santa Anita Handicap, had a purse of $125,000 and Seabiscuit had… Read the Rest »

3/30/16 – Jennifer Stevens answers “Ask a Consulting Historian”

This week on History@Work, the National Council on Public History’s blog, SHRA’s own Jennifer Stevens is profiled in their “Ask a Consulting Historian” series.  If you’ve ever wondered what a career in entrepreneurial history looks like, thought about pursuing history as a career, or just wanted to know more about SHRA, you can do so… Read the Rest »

2/17/16 – Comets

For thousands of years the night sky has elicited awe and inspiration. Cultures from around the world have drawn spiritual connections to the twinkling stars and the various shapes of the moon, but perhaps nothing has captivated the human population as much as comets. Last month I came across 19th-century sketches of comets while conducting… Read the Rest »

1 2 3 4 5